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Posts Tagged ‘Kui Lee’

Aloha kākou!  Aloha, gang!

We had some technical “hiccups” last week (at least I think that’s the scientific name for ‘em!) which prevented us from posting an Aloha Friday Trivia Challenge.  So we’re doing it on Monday, instead!

Here’s this week’s question:

According to Kui Lee’s song ONE PADDLE, TWO PADDLE,  how many times does one need to paddle on the right and left?

A.  three

B.  ten

C.  fourteen

D.  twenty

• Please submit your answer by posting a reply to this entry on the blog.
• All correct answers will be eligible to win a special email message from me.
• One winner will be randomly chosen at 11:59pm HST.

Will YOU be this week’s lucky winner?

Good Luck!

Aloha Poʻakahi! Happy Aloha Monday!

**Crooner Update:

You guys are GOOD!  Almost everyone had the right answer!  Wow!

The correct answer is C. FOURTEEN.

Here’s a funny story:  ONE PADDLE, TWO PADDLE is one of my favorite songs–even though I know almost nothing about paddling.  I wanted to share it with some kids I was working with at a school.  (They are very interested in boats!)  I knew they would ask me about that–how many times do you paddle on each side.  And they would ask me if you really paddled 14 times.  I had to ask my hānai sister who is a member of an outrigger team–and I sent her an urgent text message: “URGENT!  NEED INFO STAT!”  As Pops is always saying, “Nānā i ke kumu.”  Look to the source!

And this week’s winner, chosen randomly from all of the correct answers, is… (Drum roll, please…) LIKO!  Congrats, Liko!  You’re this week’s Trivia Super Star!

A giant MAHALO to all for playing along in this week’s Special Monday Edition of the  ALOHA TRIVIA CHALLENGE.  Another challenge will appear on Friday.  Hope you’ll take that challenge, too!

Happy Tuesday, gang.

With Aloha,

Jason

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ukulele Croonerʻs Weekly TOP 3 iPod Jason Poole Accidental Hawaiian Crooner

Aloha kākou!

I always have my iPod with me. It’s my personal jukebox.

Living in New York City, I spend a lot of time traveling underground via subway–and those rides can be long and boring! But having a collection of great music with me at all times keeps me from losing my mind. I can escape to a tropical isle with the push of a button. Portable paradise!

Here are the TOP 5 SONGS from my iPod this week:

1. Kona Daze (Dennis Pavao’s recording on the album All Hawaiʻi Stand Together )

I love the voice of  the crooner, Dennis Pavao!

This English language song usually makes me think of the Hawaiian group, Kalapana.    It was written by the legendary Malani Bilyeu.

And I usually think of Uncle Dennis Pavao singing more “traditional” Hawaiian songs.

However, I love this version that Uncle Dennis sang!  Love the soul he infuses it with.

Listening to it brings to mind the sunny dryness one finds on the island of Hawaiʻi in Kailua Kona–that heat and sunshine and blue water.  Ah… takes me there in my mind.

2. Mom (Elodia Kane’s recording on the album Tribute to Lena Machado)

Aunty Elodia Kane’s sweet soprano voice is one of my favorites.  And I love hearing her sing the songs of Aunty Lena Machado!  One sweet Hawaiian songbird honoring another!

This particular recording almost has a “Gershwin-feel” to it with the horns.  Or a theatrical piece from a classic Broadway show.  Love it.

The song, while written in English, really has a Hawaiian feel to it.  And it paints such a loving (and/or sad) portrait of what was happening in the South Pacific (and throughout the world!) when it was written.  According to another album’s liner notes, Aunty Lena Machado copyrighted the song  in June of 1944.  The soldiers and their letters home to their beloved mothers most certainly inspired this touching ballad.

It’s melody stays “up high” in the voice… making it a favorite of sopranos and falsetto (leo kʻiekiʻe) singers.

3. Ain’t No Big Thing (Kui Lee’s recording on the album The Extraordinary Kui Lee)

Triple love the fun sound of this song!  And Kui Lee–wow!

The album was recorded in 1966, I think.  And it has all of the earmarks of the era.  Organ, whistles, fantastic guitar, fun percussion.  It’s all in there.

We lost Uncle Kui too soon… I would love to be able to see what he would have created later in life.  I’m so glad we can rock out to his records!

4. Kaimana Hila (Darlene Ahuna’s recording on the album Classic Hula)

When I’m feeling “down in the dumps”–and yes!  Even Accidental Hawaiian Crooners have those kinds of days–I look to a classic, uptempo hula to help chase away the blues.

And this song, written by the amazing Charles E. King, is guaranteed to make me smile.  Like every time!

It describes some of the things one might see if one were to go holoholo (out cruising) in and around the Diamond Head side of the island of Oʻahu.  Fun!

And I love the controlled break in Darlene’s voice–maikaʻi that haʻi!  Hana hou!  Encore!

*Please click HERE to visit Darleneʻs website.

5. Hoʻokena (Ledward Kaapana’s recording on the album The Legend: Hawaiian Slack Key Guitar)

When it’s time to relax, to wind down, to shed the stresses of the day, I turn to Uncle Led Kaapana and the awesomely soothing sounds of his kī hōʻalu, his slack key guitar.

The Hawaiian word I’d use to best describe his sound is nahenahe–soothing, gentle.

We all need a little peace and tranquility.  I turn to Uncle Led’s recordings for that.

*Please click HERE to visit Uncle Led’s website.

What are YOU listening to?  Drop me a line and let me know!

And, as always, a giant MAHALO to Puna and the gang at www.mele.com for being an awesome Hawaiian music resource. You all make the world a better place!  I’m DEFINITELY thankful for that!

**Wanna be the first to know when Crooner News/Updates are posted?  You can subscribe by clicking HERE!**

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ukulele Croonerʻs Weekly TOP 3 iPod Jason Poole Accidental Hawaiian Crooner

Aloha kākou!

I always have my iPod with me. It’s my personal jukebox.

Living in New York City, I spend a lot of time traveling underground via subway–and those rides can be long and boring! But having a collection of great music with me at all times keeps me from losing my mind. I can escape to a tropical isle with the push of a button. Portable paradise!

Here are the TOP 5 SONGS from my iPod this week:

1. Kealoha (Benny Kalama’s recording on the album Legends of Falsetto)

A favorite song sung with the FANTASTIC falsetto-stylings of Mr. Benny Kalama = a huge smile on my face when I listen to this recording.

Seriously, gang, this is AWESOME!

Done like a true falsetto crooner, Benny Kalama brings this song to life so beautifully–with all the stylistic intricacies of the era.

If you’re a fan of leo kiʻekiʻe (falsetto singing) you’re going to love this.

*Please click HERE to see an article about Uncle Benny written in 2006.

2. I’ll Remember You (Myrtle K. Hilo’s recording on the album The Singing Cab Driver)

I love this song, written by the amazing Kui Lee.

And I love the super cool, raspy and ono-to-the-ears sound of Aunty Myrtle K. Hilo’s (a.k.a. The Singing Cab Driver’s) voice.

Put ‘em together, along with some awesome Hawaiian lyrics written by Pilahi Paki, and you’ve got an awesome combination.

Magic.  Pure magic.

*Please click HERE to read a fun interview/article featuring Aunty Myrtle from 2002.

3. Kanoe (Robert Cazimero & Halau Na Kamalei’s recording on the album RCHNK)

I was listening to my iPod on “shuffle mode” this week.  And this song took my surprise.  I thought, “What is this?  A Hawaiian men’s chorus?  I didn’t know I had an album like this!”

I was so excited to see that it was a recording by the legendary male hālau hula (hula school) Hālau Nā Kamalei–under the direction of the legendary musician and kumu hula (master hula teacher) Robert Uluwehi Cazimero.

When I got back to my apartment, I went right to my CD stacks to read the album’s liner notes to see who was on the recording as well as any notes that were provided.   Loved it from the first word.  And, of course, that meant I needed to listen to the album again–from start to finish!  (And I loved it, again, from the first note to the last.)

This song, written by Robert Cazimero, stole my heart.  I love it for so many reasons–especially the tenderness in the men’s voices.

*Please click HERE to learn about the exciting and award-winning documentary (by Lisette Kaualena Flanary) about the halau: NĀ KAMALEI: The Men Of Hula.

4. Puko’o Paddle (Lono’s recording on the album Old Style III)

When I think of music on Molokai today, I think of Lono–his voice and songs are so tightly woven in the tapestry of that island.

This song, written by Lono (Lonomusic) is amazing–complexly beautiful and so very simple at the same time.  I know it’s kind of a cliche to say it, but it’s like a sweet onion–with so many layers!  Contemporary music with such a truly “Old Style”-feel to it.

Do you know Lono and his music?  Please check him out.  I love him.

*Please click HERE to visit Lono’s website.

5. Let Us Dream (John Cruz’s recording on the album One of These Days)

I totally dig the music of John Cruz.

Whether he’s singing traditional Hawaiian music or a self-penned contemporary composition like this one, he always put his distinctive spin/sound on it.

This song took me back to my days working in my dad’s jazz club in Pittsburgh.  Sultry.  Smoky.  Cool.  Right on.

*Please click HERE to visit John’s website.

What are YOU listening to?  Drop me a line and let me know!

And, as always, a giant MAHALO to Puna and the gang at www.mele.com for being an awesome Hawaiian music resource. You all make the world a better place!  I’m DEFINITELY thankful for that!

**Wanna be the first to know when Crooner News/Updates are posted?  You can subscribe by clicking HERE!**

off

ukulele Croonerʻs Weekly TOP 3 iPod Jason Poole Accidental Hawaiian Crooner

Aloha kākou!

I always have my iPod with me. It’s my personal jukebox.

Living in New York City, I spend a lot of time traveling underground via subway–and those rides can be long and boring! But having a collection of great music with me at all times keeps me from losing my mind. I can escape to a tropical isle with the push of a button. Portable paradise!

Here are the TOP 5 SONGS from my iPod this week:

1. My Rose of Waikiki (Andy Iona’s recording on the album Hawaiians in Hollywood)

I love this hapa haole tune!  It’s not one that I’ve heard a million times before.  In fact, the first time I heard it was fairly recently–right after I bought this compilation album.  The song is attributed to Andy Iona and Louis Herscher–and it was recorded somewhere between 1934-1936.

The interesting thing to note is that it can be called “hapa haole” (at least in my humble opinion) because of the inclusion of the Hawaiian-named place, Waikīkī.  However, all of the other lyrics are in English.  It’s also interesting to note the possible use of kaona, or “hidden meaning.”  Is Andy Iona singing about a flower of Waikiki?  A woman named “Rose?”  Or is rose just a poetic reference to a lover that he misses?

Typical of the era, the song has all of the wonderful flourishes that make a crooner swoon.  I need to learn this one!

2.  Kamakahala (Bill Ka’iwa’s recording on the album This Is Bill Kaiwa)

I was riding on the subway the other day and this song began to play on my iPod.  I’d heard it before because–well– Bill Kaiwa is a favorite musician and I listen to his music a lot.  I was familiar with the song’s melody.  And this week, I decided it should be part of the Crooner’s Weekly “TOP 5.”  Whenever I hear it, with it’s bouncy tempo, I can’t help but smile.

I wish I could tell you what this song was about.  But to be honest, I can only make guesses.  This is one of those songs that’s full of allusions to things.  For example, I’m sure the choice of the ʻāhihi flower was deliberate–it symbolized something.  The lyrics were probably easy for folks to understand–on many level–when it was composed.  However, even as a language student, I can only make educated guesses.  The song’s lyrics can be found on the Huapala website by clicking HERE.

(I’ll be asking my teacher about this one when I’m back on Molokai later this month!)

3.  Kaimana Hila (Darlene Ahuna’s recording on the album Classic Hula)

I love this song!  It’s about a group of folks that go out “cruising” on the island of O’ahu and some of the places they visit.  One of the reasons I love Darlene’s recording is because she includes so many verses!  Most of the time I’ve sung it (and seen it danced) it only includes 3 places.  But her version includes 6!  Double the fun!

It’s got a great uptempo beat and it begs for a hula.

And if you learn the lyrics to the song, you’ll know some of the most famous places/sights on the island of Oʻahu.  What a great way to learn geography, right?

4.  Ain’t No Big Thing (Kui Lee’s recording on the album The Extraordinary Kui Lee)

Wanna listen to something groovy?  This is it!

I first heard a much-beloved version of this song as recorded by the Brothers Cazimero.  (And you guys know how much I love the CAZ!) But then I picked up the CD–and heard the song as recorded by the composer himself.  It’s got all of the cool 60s sounds including a swingin’ organ and a tambourine!  Right on!  And it delivers the awesome “No worries” vibe that Kui Lee was trying to share with the listener.

It’s a lot of fun crammed into 2 minutes and 22 seconds!

5.  ʻOpihi Moemoe (Chris Yeaton’s recording on the album Kīkaha Mālie)

I love kī hoʻalu (slack key guitar) music.  It’s no secret.

And I love it when it’s played by my “brother from another mother,” Chris Yeaton!  This song is playful and fun and full of joy.  He really makes the guitar sing!

He’s  a great musician–and a great guy.  It’s a treat to celebrate the music of someone you admire and respect.  Check out his awesome album.  Love it!

(And a big “ALOHA!” to the gang on Hawai’i Island right now.  NYC is in ‘da house!)

What are YOU listening to? Drop me a line and let me know!

And, as always, a giant MAHALO to Puna and the gang at www.mele.com for being an awesome Hawaiian music resource. You all make the world a better place!

 

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