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Posts Tagged ‘Halawa Valley’

A MUSIC VIDEO: HEALING WATERS

Monday, December 14, 2015

Have you seen it?

Matt Yamashita (Quazifilms) made a fantastic music video for my original song, HEALING WATERS!

I love it so much!  Matt recorded new footage of me singing down by the river in Hālawa Valley the day after the Molokai premier of the documentary Sons of Hālawa!  (Yup. True story. That really is the river behind me–no green screen involved!  We were so blessed with lighting and weather conditions that afternoon.  Matt set up a microphone for me to use a prop along with my headphones to create a “studio vibe.”  And here’s a fun fact for you: I used a recording of HEALING WATERS from Matt’s phone to sing along with. The phone was discretely tucked into my pocket.)

The video weaves together the newly recorded footage along with images from the film. It’s spectacular and I hope you’ll click on the link above and watch it. (And re-watch again and again!)

The video originally premiered on Facebook on Thanksgiving day. (It’s been viewed over 3,000 times already!) That was something to be thankful for, for sure! I was excited to learn he’d recently posted it on Youtube, too. Now I can share it with you!

Another video is being created for my song LIFE IN HĀLAWA, also featured on the soundtrack for the film. (Note: The songs have all been amazingly arranged and recorded by Molokai’s own LONO.  And there are 2 of his fantastic original mele on the soundtrack, too!)

More details about that and the film and the amazingly cool experience of attending the film’s premier at the Honolulu International Film Festival coming soon!

Until then, kick back and relax and let your mind go to beautiful Hālawa Valley with this video.

Right on.

With warm Aloha

Jason

 

8 Comments

Aloha, gang!

Here’s a quick video check-in about the upcoming word premier of the documentary Sons of Hālawa!

I am so excited!  One week from today!

Let the magic begin.

Right on.

*Please be sure to check out the Quazifilms website (click HERE) for more information about other exciting projects.

*For the schedule of the film’s showings, please click HERE.

4 Comments

Sharing Aloha in our public schools.

Monday, October 26, 2015

Jason Poole, Accidental Hawaiian Crooner, Molokai, Halawa Valley, Anakala Pilipo Solatorio, Midori and Friends, Aloha, teaching artist

My ‘eke (bag) filled with an ipu heke, pūʻili, a shell lei and my ʻukulele.

Last week I had the great privilege of teaching/sharing Hawaiian music and culture at a public elementary school out in Howard Beach, New York. My friends lovingly refer to it as the “far out school.”  But not in a Greg Brady or John Denver kind of “far out” way.  See, this school is about a two hour commute from my apartment. To get there, I’ve got to take the subway for about an hour and then walk approximately 1.5 miles to get to the school through neighborhoods and over footbridge that crosses a busy highway. In previous years, I’ve visited this school in the scorching heat and humidity of early summer as well as the freezing cold of deep winter with icicles hanging from my nose.

But this school is a favorite place to teach/share Hawaiian music and culture.  The students and the faculty celebrate music and diverse cultures. This was my third year acting as a visiting teacher via Midori & Friends, the non-profit music education organization I work with.  When I walked through the door last Monday, it was a homecoming of sorts. (And they always make me feel like a rock star!)

When they ask if I can come and do a residency, the answer is always a resounding YES.

Did I mention that at this school I work with the kindergarten classes? Yup. All of ‘em.  That means I’m sharing Hawaiian music and culture with about 110 students, all of ‘em about five years old.  It’s like doing four back-to-back high energy shows every day. (It reminds me of college-age summers when I performed at a theme park.) It’s wild. It’s exhausting.

And it’s one of the most soul-fulfilling experiences of my life.

It dawned on me a little while ago that most of these kids have only been on the planet for about five years. They haven’t seen all of the touristy photos and movies about Hawai’i that are circulating among the masses. They’re not familiar with with the postcard “paradise” images that so many people associate with the Hawaiian islands–and that’s a blessing. (For one thing, I don’t have to spend as much time convincing them that Hawai’i is real place with real people and not just drowsy-eyed ’ukulele strummers sitting under coconut trees or majestic surfer dudes riding the waves with ladies sitting on their shoulders.)

For a lot of them, I am giving them their first taste of the islands and traditional Hawaiian culture. (But you know, no worries. No pressure or anything!) I have the privilege/honor/kuleana of introducing them to Hawai’i.

I bring my ‘ukulele. I bring maps. I bring lots and lots of photos. I share lots and lots of stories. One of the perks of being an “outsider who became an insider” of Hawai’i and her culture is that I’ve done everything–and I mean everything–wrong at some point. I’ve stumbled and stammered and put my foot in my mouth more times than I care to disclose.  So when I tell them about Hawai’i, I share it from the perspective of a fellow newbie/neophyte. We laugh a lot. I try to make them feel like we’re all learning together.

We sing songs, both traditional school kid-kine songs and my own original compositions. This year, I wanted to write a new song about Hōkūleʻa and how the canoe will be visiting New York City in 2016. I wanted the kids to have a song they could carry and simple hula they could dance–something to share with the crew if they went to visit the boat. (Songs and hulas are free and portable. You can’t beat that!)

I really struggled with the song at first, wanting to make it perfect, wanting to write something profound. But it came down to this: I needed to create something simple and relatable for these kids. I wanted to share 2 things: Hōkūleʻa is sailing around the world. She’s carrying a message of Mālama Honua, taking care of the earth.  Once I got my ego out of the way (Imagine standing in front of the Hōkūleʻa crew with throngs of students all singing the song and doing the simple hula!) the song basically wrote itself. A simple song. A simple hula. And an opportunity to discuss how we all have the responsibility to mālama honua.

All week long, we sang and danced ourselves silly. We laughed at stories of the goofy things that Uncle Jason has done in Hawaiʻi, about being afraid of lizards in the house, about getting a bellyache from eating too much inamona.

I told them about Hālawa Valley and its lifestyle that is so much like the traditonal lifestyle of Hawaiʻi long ago.  We talked about how Mom and Pops Solatorio adopted me into their family, how I look different from all of their children, how ʻohana is family based on feeling instead of bloodline.

I gave them a very basic introduction to the Hawaiian language.

And these kids! Ah! I’ll tell you, they’re so wonderful they can make your knees buckle with their smiles and enthusiasm.

There are kids in the classroom who don’t speak English very well. But you’d be amazed to see that these are the same little kids who give you a shaka and an “Aloha, Uncle Jason!” every morning when you greet them.  There are other kids who are part of the special needs program who shock me by coming up to me and saying, “Uncle Jason, did you know there are three ways to say Hawai’i (Ha-WHY-ee, Ha-WAH-ee and Ha-VAI-ee) and also I love you.”

And when I walked down the halls of the schools in between classes, I felt like a celebrity. Those shining faces with bright eyes, those little hands giving me a shaka wave and their voices ringing out, “Aloha, Uncle Jason!”

Come on! Does it get any better than that?

On Friday, all four of the classes gathered in the school’s auditorium for our big “show.” My friend, Kaina, came to dance hula for them. And they were so excited to share the songs and keiki hulas they’d learned with her!  Imagine a school’s auditorium, nearly-filled to capacity with kindergarten students (and some fifth graders who’d recently done a report on Hawai’i), all singing and dancing.

Incredible.  It brings tears to my eyes just thinking about it.

You know, I freaked out a little bit when Pops gave me the title of Kumu Hawaii a few years ago, when he said, “Now it’s YOUR turn to be a teacher.” I asked him what I was supposed to do with that heavy responsibility. I hadn’t grown up in Hawai’i.  I didn’t think anyone would want to learn from someone like me.

But that’s where I was wrong. I was hung up on my skin color, my background, the fact that I’m not Hawaiian. He had trained me and tested me. He trusted me. I needed to trust myself.

And I remind myself of that every time I do a new residency, every time I have the opportunity to share what’s been so graciously and lovingly shared with me.

When I walked away from the school on Friday, I knew that I’d planted seeds of Aloha. Some would grow. Some might not. Some kids may remember my name someday. Some might not. But I’ll bet a lot of them will remember that a man came to their school when they were kids and he brought an ‘ukulele and wore wild shirts and leis. He sang songs and taught them to hula. And he taught them that Aloha doesn’t mean “Hi” or “Goodbye” but it really means, “I love you my friend.”

And if that’s all that they remember, then I’ve done my job.

A blessing, indeed.

Mahalo for that, kids.

Right on.

 

4 Comments

Aloha, gang!

A new addition to the website and the Crooner Video YouTube channel:

Crooner Breaks!

After talking with some folks about what they’d like to see more of here on the blog, we think this might be exactly what we need.

Check out Crooner Break #1 to see what this all about.  And then be sure to subscribe to the Crooner Video Youtube Channel (Click HERE) so that you’ll always be caught up on what’s happening.

Right on.

Sending warm Aloha to each and every one of you!

Jason

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Aloha, gang!

I’m so excited to be able to share a new song (with a VIDEO!) with you today!  And it’s a hula!

I wrote it as a gift for Maria Thomas and Rick Roberts, the creators of Zentangle®. I wrote the song last September and then recorded a selfie-style video while I was in Hālawa Valley when I was back on Molokai in March.  I sent it to the Zentangle folks last week and it was released in their newsletter yesterday. I was delighted to see it pop up on Facebook and blogs yesterday.

And when I woke up this morning, I was shocked to see that the video had been viewed over 1,500 times! (What?!  Crazy!)

Here’s some backstory for the song:

Many of you may know that I became a CZT™, a Certified Zentangle Teacher, back in 2012. I was part of the 10th graduating class of teachers (CZT 10).  Here’s the crazy thing: if you would have told me that one day I would be able to call myself an art teacher, I would have laughed.  Really hard.  But Zentangle is more than just art, it’s a method of drawing that unites the mind and the body. It rocked my world in ways I wasn’t expecting.

I didn’t become a teacher so that I could teach Zentangle classes.  Well, that wasn’t my primary reason, anyway. It was really so that I could go and study with Rick and Maria in person, to find out what this was and to learn directly from the source. Nānā i ke kumu.  Look to the source.  That’s what Pops is always telling me.  (Note: the only way to become a CZT is to study directly with them at one of their teacher-training workshops. It’s done face-to-face. I loved that aspect of it. It made it even more real, more authentic.)

I’ve taught classes here in NYC and in Chicago. I’ve held classes in Pennsylvania with students ranging in ages from 6 years old to 86 years old. And we ALWAYS have fun. It’s hard to explain. I think the best way to understand it is to take a class from a trained teacher who can lead you through the process, someone who can help you create with confidence.

Anyway… last year, the Zentangle folks asked me to come back in September and speak at one of their teacher-training workshops. They wanted me to talk about how I use Zentangle–sharing stories from classes, both formal and informal.

Now you guy know how I love to play with writing songs. Well, maybe it’s better to say I love to START writing songs. (It’s the finishing of songs that is the tough part!)  And I had this idea that I would write them a song as a makana, a gift, a way to say MAHALO and THANK YOU for all that they do.  I had a little snippet of a melody line I’d been playing with but I didn’t have any lyrics.  While I stood in line at Port Authority Bus Station, waiting for the bus to take me to the workshop in Providence, Rhode Island, it dawned on me: I would write the song in the style of a 1920s-1950s hula.

When I got to Providence, I spent the first night sitting in the hotel lobby scratching away in my notebook, writing lyrics about the Zentangle method of drawing and fitting them into the melody that I’d been playing with. (I wanted to be kind to my roommate for the weekend. He’d traveled all the way from Taiwan to attend the teacher-training!  Night owls like me do better sitting on couches in the hotel’s lobby than sitting at a desk in a room, anyway.) My goal: I wanted to have the song “ready” to share when I gave my presentation the following night. I wasn’t sure if I would share it, but I wanted to have ready. Just in case…

The next night I gave my presentation. I shared about taking Zentangle to Hālawa Valley on Molokai and how we used sticks to draw the patterns in the mud, how my young Hawaiian nephew showed me how to draw patterns he saw in nature around him. I talked about the meditative qualities of the method and how I use it in my own writing process–especially when I get stuck and my hands (and brain) won’t cooperate.

And then it was time. I took the leap into the unknown and while wearing a cordless headset microphone (like a rock star!) I strummed and sang the Zentangle Hula for an audience. For the first time.

It was so much fun.  And the coolest part? Before the end of the song, the teachers-in-training were singing along with me!  The song followed me all weekend long, in the classes, in the dining room, in the elevators.  People sang it and smiled.

Awesome.

So that’s how the song came to be. I recorded it over the spring when I was back on Molokai.  Then I lost the video. (gulp!)  Then I found the video. (phew!)

And now it has a life of its own.

Wanna learn more about Zentangle? Check out their website: https://www.zentangle.com/  (Note: the Zentangle Kit is wonderful. It’s how I got started.)

And you can read more about my story of how I reclaimed my “inner art dude” by clicking HERE.

(P.S.  Because I attended the teacher-training again last year, I’m now a DOUBLE certified teacher!  Ha!  Me–this guy that swears he can’t draw a straight line.  Do you feel that way, too?  Then Zentangle is for you.)

And please share the song/video if you feel inspired to do that. Let’s start a whole Zentangle Hula movement! (Smiles are contagious, you know.)

Much Aloha to you and your families.

Right on.

 

6 Comments

Father’s Day

Sunday, June 21, 2015

Jason Poole, Craig Poole, Pilipo Solatorio, Anakala Pilipo, Halawa Valley, Molokai, Accidental Hawaiian Crooner

2 Dads. I’m a lucky guy, for sure.

When I work in the schools, sharing Hawaiian culture and music with the kids, I run into some tricky territory.

I call my kumu, my root teacher, “Pops.”  Because he’s MORE than just my teacher; he’s my Hawaiian Dad.

But when I talk about my life outside of Hawai’i, I often reference my family back here in the continental U.S.  So to make matters a bit easier to understand…

I tell the kids I have a Pennsylvania Dad, the man who helped make me, the man who raised me and has always been my father.

AND…

I have a Hawaiian Dad, my Pops, the man who has raised me from a tadpole in all things Hawaiian.

I tell them I’m the luckiest guy in the world.  I have TWO Dads.

And you know what?  The kids totally get it.  No questions asked.

(Well… that’s not quite true. A little boy recently asked me, “How can I get two dads?”  Ha!)

I love my two Dads

And you know I’m not lyin’

One’s a Pennsylvanian

And one’s a Hawaiian.

Happy Father’s Day, gang.

Aloha Lā Makuakāne.

Right on.

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