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Posts Tagged ‘Brothers Cazimero’

Aloha, gang!

Need some help when it comes to getting motivated?  Me, too.

Here is a playlist (courtesy of my computer) to help keep you musically inspired while you work out, make your way around town, commute to work or just surround yourself in mele Aloha.

Nanina – Kuana Torres Kahele
Analani E – Na Palapalai
Lovely Sunrise Haleakala – Napua Greig
He Mele No Kauai Kaupapa – Weldon Kekauoha
Haleuia – Kuana Torres
Ohai Alii Kaluhea – Holunape
Hilo Hula – Uluwehi Guerrero
Halamua Kihi Loa – Kuana Torres Kahele
Ka Ua Kilihune – Hoku Zuttermeister
He Aloha Moku O Keawe – Na Palapalai
Papalina Lahilahi – Genoa Keawe
Hanalei Moon – Dennis Pavao
E Pili Mai – Kealii Reichel
Nani Kauai – Amy Hanaialii Gilliom
My Sweet Pikake Lei – Brothers Cazimero
Lehua Beauty – Kuana Torres Kahele
Kuu Home Alo Kele – Napua Greig
Kuu Hoaaloha – Weldon Kekauoha
He Aloha No O Honolulu – Na Palapalai
Nani Na Pali Hauliuli O Na Koolau – Hoku Zuttermeister

(Notes: The list was chosen by the “Genius” feature in iTunes.  I’ve transcribed the song titles/artists as they appear in iTunes so that they are easier to look up and reference when purchasing the tunes on the web.  I’ve purposely not used diacritical marks.  This is what I’ll be listening to while I’m on the treadmill.  Bring it on!)

Happy Aloha Monday.

Right on.

2 Comments

Aloha kākou!

Here’s this week’s question:

The legendary Hawaiian duo, the Brothers Cazimero, consists of two awesomely talented brothers.  What are their names?

A. DWIGHT AND DALE

B. NEDWARD AND NATHAN

C. ROBERT AND ROLAND

D. JOHN AND JAMES

• Please submit your answer by posting a reply to this entry on the blog.
• All correct answers will be eligible to win a special email message from me.
• One winner will be randomly chosen at 11:59pm HST.

Will YOU be this week’s lucky winner?

Good Luck!

Aloha Poʻalima! Happy Aloha Friday!

**Crooner Update:

Right on, gang!

I loved the question this week.  It made me laugh.  (I’m a fan of alliteration and coming up with the pairs of names brought a smile to my face.)

The correct answer is C. ROBERT AND ROLAND.

And this week’s winner, chosen randomly from all of the correct answers is… (Drum roll, please…) SARAH!  Congrats, Ms. Sarah!  You’re this week’s Trivia Superstar!

Mahalo to you all for taking part in this week’s challenge.  I hope you’ll play along next week, too!

Happy Weekend!

A hui hou…

Jason

8 Comments

The Crooner’s Weekly TOP 5 (9.12.12)

Wednesday, September 12, 2012

ukulele Croonerʻs Weekly TOP 3 iPod Jason Poole Accidental Hawaiian Crooner

I LOVE HAWAIIAN MUSIC!  True story.

And I listen to it all the time!  Especially when I’m on the move–either walking along NYC’s crowded sidewalks or riding the rails on the subway through the tunnels under the concrete.  (I’m convinced that it helps to keep me sane in this crazy city!)

I love a really wide variety of it: vintage, traditional, contemporary, instrumental…

And I love sharing some of my favorites with you.

Here are the TOP 5 SONGS from my iPod this week:

1. Nani (Aunty Genoa Keawe’s recording on the album Genoa Keawe Sings Luau Hulas)

One of my favorite classic hulas!  It opens with the typical “Genoa Keawe” opening–steel guitar and her unmistakable strumming of the ʻukulele.

The song, written by Alice Namakelua, describes someone’s beauty.  I’d always assumed it was a love song.  Only recently, I read the story that she’d written it for a group of young girls–her hula students–imagining their beauty as they grew older.  (How great is that?!)

The song has five verses and each one is rich with descriptive language–words that beg for a hula to illustrate them.

There’s a reason Aunty Genoa is considered to have “set the standard” when it comes to hula music.  She’s simply one of the greatest.  Ever.

*Please click HERE to visit Aunty Genoa’s website.

2. Tewe Tewe (The Brothers Cazimero’s recording on the album The First Two Albums)

Wanna dance?  This classic (and rascal!) hula will make you want to jump up out of your chair!

The song seems to be describing the slipping and sliding and arching of the ʻoʻopu (goby fish).  And wrestling a fish like that can be a lively thing, indeed.

However…  when I’ve heard the elders sing the song and seen them dance the hula, they indicate that there may be a more–well–”rascally” interpretation.  I’ll let you listen to the words and decide for yourself.

The Caz do an awesome job with this song.  Master musicians to the max.  And even though the song has been covered by so many artists, I can’t help but think of The Brothers Cazimero when someone mentions its name.

*Please click HERE to visit the Brothers Cazimero’s page at Mountain Apple Company.

3. Puaʻala (Kainani Kahaunaele’s recording on the album ʻŌhai ʻUla)

There’s something special about a hula that opens with the sounds of piano, right?

This song was written as a mele inoa or name song.  A precious gift, indeed.  According to the album’s liner notes, it was presented to Aunty Aileen Puaʻala Enos on her 70th birthday.

Kainani’s rich voice and smooth delivery knocks my socks off.  Classic and contemporary at the same time.  Traditional and jazzy.

And even if you don’t speak Hawaiian, I’ll wager you’ll be able to feel the spirit of Aloha that emanates from this beautiful song.

*Please click HERE to visit Kainani’s website.

4. Brother’s Got A Problem (Olomana’s recording on the album And So We Are)

The group, Olomana, is a favorite.  And in this song, they’ve captured the sounds of the time (the late 70s) perfectly.

It’s an English language song.  Contemporary.  Some might argue and say that it’s not a Hawaiian song but more of a pop song.  Being that it’s done by Olomana, it’s Hawaiian to me.  And there is that unmistakable-yet-impossible-to-describe “island sound” to it.

When I first went to Molokai, I was singing in a kanikapila (jam session) with the amazing Kevin Brown.  He asked me to sing another Hawaiian classic and then inserted this song–a verse of each at a time–making a medley.  Right there on the spot.  It was one of the most magical times of my musical life.  Jamming with a Hawaiian legend.  And making music on the spot.  A moment that can never be repeated–but one that plays over and over in my mind.

*Please click HERE to visit Olomana’s website.

5. Safe Passage (John Keawe’s recording on the album Hawai’i Island Is My Home)

I’m hooked.  It’s still on my list this week.  Can’t stop listening!

New Yorkers aren’t the only ones who feel stress.  You get stressed out, too, right?

One of things I love to do when I’m stressed out is put on some amazing kī hōʻalu, slack key guitar, music.  It soothes me.  Reaches down inside me and acts a pressure release.  Seriously.  I can feel my shoulders drop away from my ears…

And when it’s played by an amazingly gifted and skilled musician like John Keawe… wow!

This is one of those instrumental tracks where you are completely transported–the voice of the guitar tells the story.

Ah.

*Please click HERE to visit John’s website.

What are YOU listening to?  Drop me a line and let me know!

And, as always, a giant MAHALO to Puna and the gang at www.mele.com for being an awesome Hawaiian music resource. You all make the world a better place!  I’m DEFINITELY thankful for that!

**Wanna be the first to know when Crooner News/Updates are posted?  You can subscribe by clicking HERE!**

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Aloha kākou!

Here’s this week’s question:

Which Hawaiian recording group released the album DESTINATION PARADISE in 1998?

A.  Keahiwai

B.  The Brothers Cazimero

C.  Ho’okena

D.  Nā Palapalai

• Please submit your answer by posting a reply to this entry on the blog.
• All correct answers will be eligible to win a special email message from me.
• One winner will be randomly chosen at 11:59pm HST.

Will YOU be this week’s lucky winner?

Good Luck!

Aloha Poʻalima! Happy Aloha Friday!

**Crooner Update:  RIGHT ON!

You all really know your Hawaiian albums!  And I love that!

The answer is B. The Brothers Cazimero.  (It’s one of my favorite albums.  I think I’ll be listening to it on REPEAT all weekend!  Wanna check it out?  Please click HERE)

And this week’s winner–chosen randomly from all of the correct answers–is… (Drum roll, please…) LISA!  Congrats, Lisa!  You’re this week’s Trivia Superstar!

A giant MAHALO to everyone who participated in the Aloha Friday Trivia Challenge this week!  And I hope you’ll all play along next week, too!

Happy Weekend, gang.

A hui hou…

Jason

10 Comments

The Crooner’s Weekly “TOP 5″ (12.14.11)

Wednesday, December 14, 2011

ukulele Croonerʻs Weekly TOP 3 iPod Jason Poole Accidental Hawaiian Crooner

Aloha kākou!

I always have my iPod with me. It’s my personal jukebox.

Living in New York City, I spend a lot of time traveling underground via subway–and those rides can be long and boring! But having a collection of great music with me at all times keeps me from losing my mind. I can escape to a tropical isle with the push of a button. Portable paradise!

Here are the TOP 5 SONGS from my iPod this week:

1. The Hukilau Song (Alfred Aholo Apaka’s recording on the album Hawaiian Favorites)

It’s no secret that I love the golden-voiced crooner, Alfred Aholo Apaka.  His music is like a textbook for me.  I study his recordings and learn something new every time.  Wanna swoon?  Check out any of his recordings.  And this one is no exception!

The Hukilau Song, attributed to Mr. Jack Owens, is often dismissed as a “kitschy classic” or a “hula song for tourists.”  However, I got SCHOOLED (aka “educated AND scolded!”) for making that comment in front of Pops.  I’d been asking him about how Hālawa Valley residents fished in the bay when he was little boy.  He told me the significance of this song.  And it changed me forever!  Now I view the song through “fresh eyes.”  And I’m amazed at how important it is! (I’m writing a blog post about that.  Stay tuned!)

*Please click HERE to visit a tribute page for Uncle Alfred Apaka on Facebook.

2. Aloha ʻOe (Amy Hānaialiʻi and Willie K’s recording on the album Nostalgia)

This classic Hawaiian song has been calling to me, lately.  I mean, sometimes I hear it when I first wake up.  No… not in a “ghostly” way.  But in my mind, I hear it playing.  And the funny thing is that I never really had any kind of feeling toward it.  Yes… it’s a beautiful song.  Yes… it has an incredible story.  Yes… it was written by Queen Liliʻuokalani.  But I never really reacted to it. (And in the spirit of full disclosure, I used to feel guilty about that.)

The strange thing is that NOW it’s like I can’t stop listening to it.  I’m kind of–well–obsessed with it. I love it.  I love the imagery.  I love the melody–simple but tugs at the heart.  And I can’t get enough of the language–the poetry of the lyrics.  It blows my mind.

I’ve heard that the song is copyright free.  Public domain.  That means I can record it, right?  I’m seeing a new mele  page in the works… Stay tuned.

This may be one of my favorite songs of all times.  And Amy’s voice–as always–is fantastic.  There is something almost ethereal about her voice in this recording–like it’s calling from the past.  Wow. And when she collaborated musically with Willie K, it was magic!

*Please click HERE to visit Amy’s website.

*Please click HERE to visit Willie K’s website

3. Pua Hone (The Brothers Cazimero’s recording on the album Hoʻala)

The Brothers Camizero have a sound that takes me instantly to Oʻahu.  It’s like being teleported to the islands via the touch of a button.  How cool is that?  (And so much cheaper than airfare these days!  Auē!)

This classic love song, written by Rev. Dennis Kamakahi, is given the royal treatment by The Caz.  So loving.  So gentle.  So nahenahe.  And their signature sound–and the measures of “loo loo loo” that say “Hey!  This is a Brothers Cazimero song!” make me smile from ear to ear.

Triple love it.  And this version is a hula dancer’s dream–no instrumental verses.  Perfect!

*Please click HERE to visit the Brothers Cazimero’s page at Mountain Apple Company.

4. Constellations (Kaukahi’s recording–featuring Jack Johnson–on the album Life In These Islands)

Ok.  This song rocks my world. And Kaukahi’s recording (which features the one and only Jack Johnson!) is fantastic!!  I love the sound of the amazing Hawaiian group accompanying Jack on this now-classic/neo-classic song.

Like many folks, I first heard the song on Jack’s album, In Between Dreams.  I remember thinking there was something different about the song.  The story that it told stood out.  It felt like old-style Hawaiian storytelling.

And then, when I saw it pop up on Kaukahi’s 2006 release, I thought, “RIGHT ON!  This is a good thing.  This is gonna be GOOD!”

I was delighted when I first heard their collaboration. And I remain delighted with every listening.  It tickles the ears.  The guitar.  The harmonies.  Trust me.  This is ono-licious!

*Please click HERE to visit Kaukahi’s website.

*Please click HERE to visit Jack Johnson’s website.

5. Kuʻu Ipo Onaona (Ledward Kaapana’s recording on the album Treasures of Hawaiian Slack Key Guitar)

You guys know that I love kī hōʻalu (slack key guitar) music.  It soothes this New Yorker’s often-frazzled nerves.

When Uncle Led plays this slack key classic–ah! The tension that holds my shoulders up by ears drains away.  So good!  It moves along with intention and purpose, yet never loses its sense of playfulness and fun.

(*Note:  This album, featuring some of the greatest living slack key players and entertainers, won the Grammy Award in 2008 for Hawaiian Music Album of the Year.)

*Please click HERE to visit Uncle Led’s website.

**Christmas Bonus Song:  Kanaka Christmas (Lucky Luck’s recording on the album Santa’s Gone Hawaiian!)

This one makes me laugh.  For real.  Good family fun for the holidays.  And you can’t go wrong with Uncle Lucky Luck and his antics and his awesome Pidgin’-kine holiday story.  This track, while it’s spoken word, is extremely musical.  The music is in the rhythm and the sound of the language itself.

I’m so glad this recording has been preserved and released on CD for new generations to listen to it.

What are YOU listening to?  Drop me a line and let me know!

And, as always, a giant MAHALO to Puna and the gang at www.mele.com for being an awesome Hawaiian music resource. You all make the world a better place!  I’m DEFINITELY thankful for that!

**Wanna be the first to know when Crooner News/Updates are posted?  You can subscribe by clicking HERE!**

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The Crooner’s Weekly “TOP 5″ (9.28.11)

Wednesday, September 28, 2011

ukulele Croonerʻs Weekly TOP 3 iPod Jason Poole Accidental Hawaiian Crooner

Aloha kākou!

I always have my iPod with me. It’s my personal jukebox.

Living in New York City, I spend a lot of time traveling underground via subway–and those rides can be long and boring! But having a collection of great music with me at all times keeps me from losing my mind. I can escape to a tropical isle with the push of a button. Portable paradise!

Here are the TOP 5 SONGS from my iPod this week:

1. Home Kapaka (Kahauanu Lake Trio’s recording on the album At The Halekulani Hotel)

I love this song.  And that’s a good thing, too.  I’ve played it about 100 times this week!

Some of our NYC-based hula dancers asked if I’d learn it so they could have live music while they rehearsed.  (And you know how much I LOVE to play for the dancers!)  Unfortunately, I wasn’t as familiar with the song–or at least the lyrics of the song–as I’d hoped.  And that was a great excuse to really immerse myself in studying the song.

I looked through my CD collection and found several different versions.  Each one of ‘em distinct.  Each one of ‘em perfect in their own right.

But this week, while I’ve been strumming and singing, I’ve been hearing Kahauanu Lake Trio’s version in my head.  It’s very polished.  Very refined.  Very representative of their sound–and the sound of the Halekulani Hotel in Waikīkī.  Dreamy…

2. Home in the Islands (The Brothers Cazimero’s recording on the album The Best of the Brothers Cazimero )

Wanna feel like you’re back in the islands?  Looking for a song to create a mood?  Look no further.  This is it.

From the opening sounds of the guitar and the first taste of the Brothers Cazimero’s tight harmonies, I’m back on Oʻahu–tooling around in a car with the windows down.  It takes me there instantly.

Robert Cazimero sang the song at the piano–as a solo– when he was here in NYC this past weekend. When he sang it, I got a little choked up.  That familiar aching in my chest because I want to be in the islands.  Auē… (Please click HERE to read more about that performance.)

Thankfully, this recording takes me there–and that means I can go to Hawaiʻi in my mind just by pushing PLAY.

*Please click HERE to visit the Brothers Cazimero website.

3. Waiomina (The Hoʻopiʻi Brothers’ recording on the album Nā Mele Hoʻoheno)

I love leo kiʻekiʻe, Hawaiian falsetto singing.  And who does it better than the legendary Hoʻopiʻi Brothers?!

I was riding the subway downtown this week and my music was playing in “shuffle” mode. This song came on and it brought an instant smile to my face–which is really saying something since it was a packed subway car during rush hour!

The song has that powerful paniolo (cowboy) feeling built into it.  A wonderful and wild strum on the guitar and ʻukulele.  And fantastic harmonies in their distinctive soaring vocals.

Come on.  It’s so ʻono!

4. Hana Calls (Ernie Cruz Jr.’s recording on the album Portraits)

This song has been a favorite for a long time.

I first heard it on a Kaʻau Crater Boys album, Tropical Hawaiian Day.  The song was fast and fun.  And it featured their distinctive brand of harmonies and ʻukulele flair.

I was thrilled to hear it again on Ernie Cruz Jr.s solo album.  A blast from the past.  A little slower than the earlier version, but still a song that moves along like a sailboat that’s caught a good gust of wind.

(Interesting to note that the Kaʻau Crater Boys recording is in the key of G while Ernie Cruz Jr.’s solo recording is a fourth higher–in the key of C.  When I’ve had the pleasure of singing it with slack key guitar players, I like to sing it in G–it’s an easy/friendly key for them.  But when I’m jamming the song by myself, I like to do it in C.)

*Please click HERE to visit Ernie Cruz, Jr.’s myspace page

5. Liloa’s Mele (Sonny Chillingwoth’s recording on the album Endlessly)

I love kī hōʻalu (slack key guitar) music!  It’s no secret.

And Uncle Sonnyʻs masterful touch makes everyone of his recordings a delight to listen to.

I needed to listen to something soothing the other night. (Insomnia and I have become friends, again.)  I started looking through my collection of slack key albums and put together a playlist of songs that would soothe my stressed nerves.  It was heavenly.

And this song was a favorite, for sure.

But I have to admit that I had a hard time just closing my eyes and listening to it–or I should say I had a hard time listening to it mindlessly.  As I listened, I had to sit up.  I had to imagine what his fingers must have looked like while he played this song on the guitar.  A real master.

The album’s liner notes tell a nice story about how the song was written for one of Uncle Sonny’s grandchildren.  What a legacy he’s left for them!

*Please click HERE to visit Dancing Cat Records’ Sonny Chillingworth page.

What are YOU listening to?  Drop me a line and let me know!

And, as always, a giant MAHALO to Puna and the gang at www.mele.com for being an awesome Hawaiian music resource. You all make the world a better place!

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