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Posts Tagged ‘Amy Hanaiali’i Gilliom’

The Crooner’s Weekly TOP 5 (8.29.12)

Wednesday, August 29, 2012

ukulele Croonerʻs Weekly TOP 3 iPod Jason Poole Accidental Hawaiian Crooner

Aloha kākou!

I always have my iPod with me. It’s my personal jukebox.

Living in New York City, I spend a lot of time traveling underground via subway–and those rides can be long and boring! But having a collection of great music with me at all times keeps me from losing my mind. I can escape to a tropical isle with the push of a button. Portable paradise!

Here are the TOP 5 SONGS from my iPod this week:

1.  Beyond The Reef (The Waikiki Hula Boys’ recording on the album Hula)

I scored a copy of this classic album from 1954 when it was released on CD–complete with Japanese liner notes!–a few years ago.  It’s awesome!

Voices are just “part of the band” in this group with simple “Ooohs.”  The lineup of musicians include: Harry Baty, Pua Almeida, Sam Kaapuni, Danny Stewart, Sam Koki, Bud Smith and Andy Iona!  How cool is that?

Super “period perfect” in sound–like stepping through a sound portal directly into 1954.  I love it.  Dreamy!

And this crooner classic song is given the royal treatment by these amazing musicians.

2. Pupule (Crazy) (Melveen Leed’s recording on the album Melveen’s County Hits)

I love Willie Nelsons’s country classic, CRAZY.  And I love the voice of Aunty Melveen.  Put ‘em together and you get an awesome combination!

But wait! It get’s even better!  Then she sings part of the song in Hawaiian!  Come on–how cool is that?  (Queen of Hawaiian Country, Aunty Melveen never disappoints.)

I always say that Hawaiian music and country music are close cousins.  And with this song, you can listen and see for yourself.

3. Lei ʻOhu (Ata Damasco’s recording on the album Paʻina Hou!)

Ah!  An uptempo, bouncy hula sung by one of my favorite voices, Ata Damasco!

Similar to some other songs, this song names a famous chief and the beloved flower lei attributed to nā moku ʻehā, the four islands of Oʻahu, Maui, Hawaiʻi Island and Kauaʻi.  But this song has a fantastic swing–it’s a standout AND it stands alone.  Right on!

*Please click HERE to visit Ata’s page at Ululoa Records.

4. Lehuaʻula (Amy Hānaialiʻi Gilliom & Willie K’s recording on the album Hawaiian Tradition)

When I took my first tentative steps in hula, I listened to this album all the time.  And, truth be told, I practiced basic hula hands and hula footwork to this song, too!

It always will hold a special place in my heart.

Amy’s wonderful and soothing voice–and the steady hula rhythm!–makes this an ideal song to play when practicing your steps.

*Please click HERE to visit Amy’s website.

*Please click HERE to visit Willie Ks website.

5. Kamalani (Herb Ohta Jr’s recording on the album ʻUkulele Dream)

This song has been inspiring me to pick up my ʻukulele this week.  To pick it up and PICK individual notes on the ʻukulele instead of strumming it.

I’m a simple strummer–but this song and Herb’s musical genius, makes me want to be able to pick.  To be more versatile on the ukulele.  To become a better instrumental player.

Gotta love being inspired!

(And this song always makes me think of my buddies Tommy and Kbelle.  Cheers, guys!)

*Please click HERE to visit Herb Ohta Jr’s website.

What are YOU listening to?  Drop me a line and let me know!

And, as always, a giant MAHALO to Puna and the gang at www.mele.com for being an awesome Hawaiian music resource. You all make the world a better place!  I’m DEFINITELY thankful for that!

**Wanna be the first to know when Crooner News/Updates are posted?  You can subscribe by clicking HERE!**

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ukulele Croonerʻs Weekly TOP 3 iPod Jason Poole Accidental Hawaiian Crooner

Aloha kākou!

I always have my iPod with me. It’s my personal jukebox.

Living in New York City, I spend a lot of time traveling underground via subway–and those rides can be long and boring! But having a collection of great music with me at all times keeps me from losing my mind. I can escape to a tropical isle with the push of a button. Portable paradise!

Here are the TOP 5 SONGS from my iPod this week:

1. Hiʻilawe ( The Aloha Pumehana Serenaders’ recording on the album Hula Gems)

From the opening strumming of the ukulele, I was hooked.  100%  (The strum reminds me of a strum one might hear on an Aunty Genoa Keawe recording.)

The classic song about the waterfall known as Hiʻilawe on Hawaiʻi Island gets such royal treatment by the Aloha Pumehana Serenaders.  Smooth. Crooner-ific.  And yet totally danceable!  Right on!

2. Mālama Mau Hawaiʻi (Amy ‘s recording on the album Hānaialiʻi)

Another song with a super-catchy, infectious strum!  And this one also has moments of Flamenco guitar!  Give it a listen and you’ll see what I mean.

This song really features the stellar voice of Amy Hānaialii Gilliom so beautifully–highlighting her middle-to-low range.  Showcasing the emotion she brings to a piece.  Like a friend of mine says, “Her voice is like butter!”

And it bears the unmistakeable stamp of Willie K. and his fantastic musicianship.  Those cleanly executed/articulated fast strums.  Such power and control!

*Please click HERE to visit Amy’s website.

*Please click HERE to visit Wille K’s website.

3. Blue Lei (Bill Akamuhou’s recording on the album Hukilau Hulas)

This is a classic hapa-haole tune!  Crooner-ific to ‘da max!

The first time I really remember hearing it–I mean really listening to the song and its lyrics–was when my friend, Liko, sang it at a party at Aloha Music Camp when it was still being held on the island of Molokai.  He jammed this sweet vintage tune and strummed the ʻukulele and melted everyone’s hearts.

It’s a tough one to strum, though!  Not a beginner’s tune on the ʻukulele–it’s got some complex chords.  (But totally worth the effort to learn it!)

*Please click HERE to read more about Bill Akamuhou on squareone.org.

4. Nightbird (Kalapana’s recording on the album Kalapana)

You guys know how much I love a good ’70′s vibe.

And this song OPENS with jazz flute!  Are you kidding me?  Awesome!

I mean this song just begs to be listened to while cruising along in a car with the windows down and warm trade winds blowing your  (feathered?) hair around.

Ah… Kalapana… Mahalo for the gift of this song.

*Please click HERE to check out Kalapana’s page at last.fm

5. E Kuʻu Morning Dew (Instrumental) (Steven Espaniola’s recording on the album Hoʻomaka)

I was listening to this song today and my heart said “YES!”–it’s so good!

This classic song, written by Eddie Kamae, is given the royal treatment by Steven Espaniola with beautiful (and complex!) ʻukulele playing.  Right on.

After the song had finished playing, I played it, again.  And again.  Yup.  Three times.  It’s that good.  Trust me.

*Please click HERE to visit Steven’s website.

What are YOU listening to?  Drop me a line and let me know!

And, as always, a giant MAHALO to Puna and the gang at www.mele.com for being an awesome Hawaiian music resource. You all make the world a better place!  I’m DEFINITELY thankful for that!

**Wanna be the first to know when Crooner News/Updates are posted?  You can subscribe by clicking HERE!**

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The Crooner’s Weekly “TOP 5″ (2.8.12)

Wednesday, February 8, 2012

ukulele Croonerʻs Weekly TOP 3 iPod Jason Poole Accidental Hawaiian Crooner

Aloha kākou!

I always have my iPod with me. It’s my personal jukebox.

Living in New York City, I spend a lot of time traveling underground via subway–and those rides can be long and boring! But having a collection of great music with me at all times keeps me from losing my mind. I can escape to a tropical isle with the push of a button. Portable paradise!

Here are the TOP 5 SONGS from my iPod this week:

1. Wahine Uʻi (Andy Cummings & His Hawaiian Serenader’s recording on the album The Wandering Troubadours)

I needed a good dose of vintage Hawaiian music this week and I looked to one of my favorites, Mr. Andy Cummings.  His style is so classy!  That falsetto of his–wow!  And the sultry sound of the lap steel guitar… so good!

The song, attributed to John K. Almeida, is a favorite, too.  The title says it all, Beautiful Woman.  (Or perhaps the song praises several beautiful women?!)

A classic and a favorite.

*Please click HERE to read Square One’s bio page of Andy Cummings.

2. Hanohano Hawaiʻi (The Sons of Hawaiʻi’s recording on the album The Folk Music of Hawaiʻi)

A classic, traditional Hawaiian song done in a classic and traditional Hawaiian way!  And who better to do that than Eddie Kamae and the Sons of Hawaiʻi?

The song sings of four of the main/major Hawaiian islands (Hawaiʻi, Maui, Oʻahu and Kauaʻi) and tells of the flower associated with that island.

I needed this song this week.  Something simple that I could strum and sing along with.

Right on.

*Please click HERE to read a tribute page about the Sons of Hawaiʻi.

3. Ā ʻOia (The Kahauanu Lake Trio’s recording on the album He Aloha Nō ʻO Honolulu)

I love this song, don’t you?

Attributed to John K. Almeida, this song’s title proclaims, “That’s it!”  The uptempo classic bounces along and compels the listener to smile.  The singer tells his/her intended that they will win them over.  (Or that they already have won them over!)

And when it’s done by Uncle K. and the Trio, you know it’s being done by the best.  Triple love their recording of it!

I love to see this hula, too!  I’ve seen many hula groups use pūʻili, split bamboo, when they dance this song.  Fantastic!

*Please click HERE to read a classic article about Uncle K. from the Starbulletin archives.

4. Haleʻiwa Hula (Aunty Genoa Keawe’s recording on the album Hulas of Hawaiʻi)

If I’m ever feeling down or depressed (or suffering from “winter blues”) I know that Aunty Genoa’s voice will pick me right up and help me find my smile.

Her unmistakable haʻi (female version of Hawaiian falsetto sings) is the best there is.  And I’m convinced you can hear the smile in her voice when she sings!

This song, written by Amy Hānaialiʻi Gilliom’s grandmother, Jennie Wood, is a hula classic.  And it’s a song every Hawaiian musician should know!

LOVE IT!

*Please click HERE to visit Aunty Genoa Keawe’s website.

5.  ’Neath One Big Tin Roof (Aunty Nona Beamer & Keola Beamer’s recording on the album The Golden Lehua Tree)

This story and song brings tears to my eyes when I hear it.  I love it, for sure.  And it brings such wonderful memories to mind.

I first heard this song at Aloha Music Camp when I attended it in 2007 when it was on the island of Molokai.  Aunty Nona, Keola, Moanalani and Kaliko all presented it one evening after the classes and workshops had finished for the day.  Seeing them all together, singing and laughing and telling this charming story of a giant family–comprised of all sorts of creatures!–is an image I’ll hold in my heart forever.

Aunty Nona has left an amazing legacy.  And it’s inspiring to watch her family carry on her work.  And to see all of the seeds that she planted in folks over the years taking root and flourishing.

I’m so thankful for this recording.

**A giant “ALOHA!” to everyone at Aloha Music Camp this week.  I’m there strumming and singing with you in spirit.**

*Please click HERE to visit Aloha Music Camp’s official website.

*Please click HERE to visit Keola’s website.

*Please click HERE to visit Kaliko Beamer-Trapp’s website.

*Please click HERE to visit the Mohala Hou Foundation’s website.

What are YOU listening to?  Drop me a line and let me know!

And, as always, a giant MAHALO to Puna and the gang at www.mele.com for being an awesome Hawaiian music resource. You all make the world a better place!  I’m DEFINITELY thankful for that!

**Wanna be the first to know when Crooner News/Updates are posted?  You can subscribe by clicking HERE!**

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The Crooner’s Weekly “TOP 5″ (2.1.12)

Wednesday, February 1, 2012

ukulele Croonerʻs Weekly TOP 3 iPod Jason Poole Accidental Hawaiian Crooner

Aloha kākou!

I always have my iPod with me. It’s my personal jukebox.

Living in New York City, I spend a lot of time traveling underground via subway–and those rides can be long and boring! But having a collection of great music with me at all times keeps me from losing my mind. I can escape to a tropical isle with the push of a button. Portable paradise!

Here are the TOP 5 SONGS from my iPod this week:

1. Ka Pua E (The Mākaha Sons of Niʻihau’s recording on the album Nā Mele Hoʻoheno Vol.1)

This hapa-haole song, attributed on the album’s liner notes to Edward Marino, is lovely!  It brought an instant smile to my face.  And in my mind, I choreographed a hula to it!  Ha!

I love listening to the young voices that made up the Mākaha Sons of Niʻihau.  Their tight, Hawaiian-style harmonies make my head tingle.

While it would definitely change if sung by a solo artist (i.e. no harmonies), this song could become a crooner staple.  I think I need to learn it and add it to my repertoire.

*Please click HERE to read Tropical Music’s brief (but informative!) bio of the Mākaha Sons of Niʻihau.

2. Kupa Landing (The Hoʻopiʻi Brother’s recording on the album Hawaiian Classics)

A favorite!  Many folks know this song by its distinctive hui (chorus) where the Hoʻopiʻi Brothers rock out with their amazing leo kiʻekiʻe (falsetto) stylings and paniolo (cowboy)-style yodeling!

The song describes Kupa Landing (Cooper Landing) at Hoʻokena on Hawaiʻi Island. It must have been an amazing place in its heydey–the way it makes the singer break out into song with such jubilation.  (Especially the way the Hoʻopiʻi Brothers sing it!  Wow!)

They are so quick and amazing in this recording that it never fails to make me laugh.  The sound is pure and wild and FUN.

*Please click HERE to read their bio on Mele.com.

*Sadly, Uncle Sol passed away in 2006.  Please click HERE to read about his amazing life in his obituary.

3. Miliʻōpua (Cody Pueo Pata’s recording on the album He Aloha…)

Cody Pueo Pata’s leo kiʻekiʻe (falsetto) always amazes me.  I remember being in a car on Oʻahu and hearing his voice on the radio.  I asked everyone in the car to stop talking so that we could just listen.  He makes it sound effortless, gliding from low to high.

This song, written by Pata, describes a hill on Oʻahu–but he refers to the song as a mele hoʻoipoʻipo.  Often times in Hawaiian music, there is an “implied meaning” that lies just beneath the surface/literal meaning of a song.  It’s called kaona.  Sometimes a composer will tell you what they meant or implied, like Pata does with this song.  Other times, you are left on your own to sit and imagine what the composer might have been saying with the song.

This is a favorite.

*Please click HERE Ululoa Productions’ webpage for this album.

4. Kihawahine (Amy Hānaialiʻi Gilliom and Willie K’s recording on the album Hawaiian Tradition)

The first time I heard this song, I was sure I was listening to a lullaby.  It’s so soothing!  Gentle ʻukulele and voice open the song.  And then a lovely piano joins in the mix.

I remember when I went to the album’s liner notes to read more about it.  The song, written by Keliʻi Tauʻā, is about the lizard goddess, Kihawahine.  I was shocked!  I guess I’d figured that a song about a lizard goddess would be fierce instead of gentle.  It just goest to show you how we are influenced by our environments–I was certainly limited by my own preconceptions.

A favorite song, indeed.  And Amy’s voice, as always, is incredible.

*Please click HERE to visit Amy’s website.

*Please click HERE to visit Willie K’s website.

5.  Rainbow Ridge (Jeff Peterson’s recording on the album Maui On My Mind)

This morning I was sitting at my computer with a cup of coffee listening to music on “shuffle mode” and I was blown away by this song from Jeff’s album, Maui on My Mind.

I love the rich tradition of kī hōʻalu, slack key guitar. And I love the sound of contemporary guitar artists.  And Jeff marries both the traditional and the new so brilliantly in this recording.

I’m always intrigued by a song’s title for an instrumental track.  Always curious about why the composer called it by that name.  But this song really invokes a sense of place.  In the story I’ve written in my mind, it’s a place Jeff goes to–a place both ancient and new.  Full of life.  A place that invigorates him.

This track rocked my morning.  I hope it rocks your world, too!

*Please click HERE to visit Jeff’s website.

What are YOU listening to?  Drop me a line and let me know!

And, as always, a giant MAHALO to Puna and the gang at www.mele.com for being an awesome Hawaiian music resource. You all make the world a better place!  I’m DEFINITELY thankful for that!

**Wanna be the first to know when Crooner News/Updates are posted?  You can subscribe by clicking HERE!**

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The Crooner’s Weekly “TOP 5″ (1.4.12)

Wednesday, January 4, 2012

ukulele Croonerʻs Weekly TOP 3 iPod Jason Poole Accidental Hawaiian Crooner

Aloha kākou!

I always have my iPod with me. It’s my personal jukebox.

Living in New York City, I spend a lot of time traveling underground via subway–and those rides can be long and boring! But having a collection of great music with me at all times keeps me from losing my mind. I can escape to a tropical isle with the push of a button. Portable paradise!

Here are the TOP 5 SONGS from my iPod this week:

1. Hawaiian Love Call (Alfred Aholo Apaka’s recording on the album My Isle of Golden Dreams)

It’s no secret:  I love the voice the golden voice of the legendary crooner, Alfred Aholo Apaka.  He has a way of delivering a song that can make me stop in my tracks and just listen.  How amazing is that?!

This song, attributed to Aunty Irmgard Farden Aluli, is a classic. And this recording, which opens with the sound of a harp(!) is a classic, too.  Beautiful orchestration.  Beautiful background vocals that take part in a kind of call and response, both in English and Hawaiian.  And of, course, the voice of Alfred Apaka.

A perfect combination!

2. Nani Koʻolau (Robi Kahakalau’s recording on the album Keiki O Ka Āina)

I dare you listen to this song without a breaking a smile!

The incredible Troy Fernandez and his ʻukulele stylings open the track with a bouncy beat, guaranteed to make you tap your feet.

I love Sistah Robi’s voice–its smoky huskiness that tickles the ear.  (I have a friend here in NYC that sounds like Robi when she speaks.  Sometimes I ask her to repeat herself when she speaks–not because I didn’t hear her, but because I want to hear her again!  Ha!)

And this song, written by Abbey Kong, is a smile-inducing three minute ride of fun.

*Please click HERE to visit Sistah Robi’s website.

3. Kīhei (Mark Yamanaka’s recording on the album Lei Pua Kenikeni)

I have been LOVING this song this week.

It’s a classic song written by the legendary Kai Davis.  The song celebrates the beauty of the district of Kīhei on the island of Maui.  When you listen to it, I’ll bet you can imagine a great hula being danced to illustrate the lyrics.

And when Mark Yamanaka brings his smooth and effortless falsetto to the song, it ROCKS! (At least he makes it sound effortless!)  His sound excites me–it makes me want to listen more.  Im sure Im just one of his legion of fans–this guy can SING!!  Uihā!

*Please click HERE to visit Mark’s page at Reverbnation.

4. ʻO ʻOe Nō (Kūpaoa’s recording on the album English Rose)

When I heard this song, I got choked up.  I’ll be the first to admit that my Hawaiian language skills are rudimentary.  But you don’t need to be able to speak Hawaiian in order to understand the sentiment.

A song written for her beloved, Kalikolihau professes her love so beautifully.  When I sat down with the lyrics in front of me, it brought tears to my eyes.  And the way they trade parts–one singing harmony for while and then switching to carry the melody.  You can tell they love each other so much–their voices blend seamlessly. (There were moments where I was reminded of another favorite contemporary Hawaiian duet with close vocal harmonies, Kaʻena–recorded by Amy Hānanialiʻi Gilliom and Fiji on Amy’s album, Puʻuhonua.)

LOVE THIS!

*Please click HERE to visit Kūpaoa’s website.

5. Ka ʻŌpae (The Sons of Hawaiʻi’s recording on the album Yesterday and Today)

When you want the sound of old Hawaiʻi–you know… the kind of music that could be played at a backyard paʻina (party)or a kanikapila (Hawaiian-style jam session)–where do you go?  The Sons of Hawaiʻi!

This song, written (and sung, too!) by Dennis Kamakahi is like a fest for my hungry ears.  Maybe it’s because I’m getting ready to head back to the islands and I’m getting excited.  But I was really looking for something to give me what I was looking for.  And this song did it.  Right on!

*Please click HERE to visit the Sons of Hawaiʻi’s website.

What are YOU listening to?  Drop me a line and let me know!

And, as always, a giant MAHALO to Puna and the gang at www.mele.com for being an awesome Hawaiian music resource. You all make the world a better place!  I’m DEFINITELY thankful for that!

**Wanna be the first to know when Crooner News/Updates are posted?  You can subscribe by clicking HERE!**

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The Crooner’s Weekly “TOP 5″ (12.28.11)

Wednesday, December 28, 2011

ukulele Croonerʻs Weekly TOP 3 iPod Jason Poole Accidental Hawaiian Crooner

Aloha kākou!

I always have my iPod with me. It’s my personal jukebox.

Living in New York City, I spend a lot of time traveling underground via subway–and those rides can be long and boring! But having a collection of great music with me at all times keeps me from losing my mind. I can escape to a tropical isle with the push of a button. Portable paradise!

Here are the TOP 5 SONGS from my iPod this week:

1. Alekoki (Darlene Ahuna’s recording on the album All The Best Of Darlene Ahuna-Vol. 1)

This song, whose lyrics are attributed to Lunalilo and music to Lizzie Alohikea, is a classic.  And a favorite.

The stories I’ve heard say that Lunalilo wrote the song because he was disappointed he could not marry the woman he’d hoped, Victoria Kamamalu.  The song’s lyrics are beautifully poetic, rich with imagery.  And it begs for a hula.

I love Darlene Ahuna’s recording–I love her haʻi (female “falsetto” or break) and I love how she lets the lines drop off in a sigh… like that of an exasperated would-be lover.  Right on!

For a great written history of the song, check out one of my favorite books: Nā Mele O Hawaiʻi Nei (Samuel Elbert and Noelani Mahoe.)

•Please click HERE to see Hawaii411′s interview with Darlene Ahuna.

2. Kalua (Love Song of Kalua) (Hui ʻOhana’s recording on the album The Best of Hui ʻOhana)

A vintage song given the royal treatment by the incomparable super-group of Hawaiian music, Hui ʻOhana!

The song, written by Ken Darby, was used in the 1952 movie, Bird of Paradise.  Its haunting melody appealed to many–making it a classic.

And when it’s performed by Hui ʻOhana (and this is a LIVE recording!)–well–it’s awesome.  Like amazingly awesome.  Stellar.

The name Kalua always makes me secretly chuckle a bit.  Did they call her “The Pit?”  Ha!

3. Nā Manu O Kalani Nui (Amy Hānaiali’i Gilliom & Wilie K’s recording on the album Hawaiian Tradition)

Ah!  This recording brings back such memories!  I listened to this album non-stop when I first started learning some of the hula basics.

And this song was a favorite because it was bright and bouncy, but still gentle.  Still nahenahe.

Years later, I studied the song’s lyrics (written by Keliʻi Tauʻā) as  part of my Hawaiian language studies.  The song’s verses consist of only two lines each.  I remember sitting with Pukui and Elbert’s Hawaiian Dictionary on the table and going through word by word.

Amy’s voice shines brilliantly on this track.  Once a favorite.  Always a favorite.

*Please click HERE to visit Amy’s website.

*Please click HERE to visit Willie K’s website.

4. Poetry Man (Nā Leo Pilimehana’s recording on the album Anthology I 1984-1996)

I first heard the amazing Phoebe Snow sing this song when I was young boy.  It was a favorite of mine while I was growing up.  And judging by the song’s success, it was a favorite song for a lot of people!

While on Oʻahu years later, I heard the song on the radio.  But this was a different version–a group with tight vocal harmonies was rocking the airwaves.  And while they paid homage to Snow’s original recording, they also succeeded in making it their own.

I was delighted when I realized it was Nā Leo Pilimehana (a.k.a. Nā Leo).  I love them and love their music.

And this is a winning combination: a great song covered by a great group.

*Please click HERE to visit Nā Leo’s website

5. Room Service (Rap Reiplinger’s recording on the album Poi Dog with Crabs)

This comedy sketch always cracks me up!  I mean it:  EVERY TIME!

I love this whole album, but this one track gets me.  Perhaps because it highlights some of the differences in “haole speech” versus “local speech”?   And the uptight man ordering room service?  Auē!  I hope I don’t come across that way!  Local-style humor, to the max!

While I may not order “pickled pigs’ feet” from the menu, I would order this hotel’s room service any time!

*Please click HEREto see a video of the sketch via Mountain Apple Company’s Youtube channel.

What are YOU listening to?  Drop me a line and let me know!

And, as always, a giant MAHALO to Puna and the gang at www.mele.com for being an awesome Hawaiian music resource. You all make the world a better place!  I’m DEFINITELY thankful for that!

**Wanna be the first to know when Crooner News/Updates are posted?  You can subscribe by clicking HERE!**

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