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Posts Tagged ‘aloha i kekahi i kekahi’

#ShareAloha

Thursday, December 3, 2015

Jason Poole, Accidental Hawaiian Crooner, Molokai, Halawa Valley, Aloha i kekahi i kekahi

Sharing Aloha is something everyone can do.

It doesn’t need to be a grand gesture.

It can be simple:

Nourishing and caring for the self, both in mind and body, so that we can present our best selves to the world

Taking a deep breath to center yourself before engaging in a conversation.

Offering your seat to someone on a crowded bus or subway

Holding the door for someone

A kind smile as you pass someone on the street 

Saying “Aloha” to a friend or neighbor (or even – gulp! – a stranger!)

We CAN make a difference in the world by starting with our own actions. Simply Sharing Aloha in our own way can make a diffence, one person at a time. A ripple effect, as the wave of Aloha spreads out and reaches more and more people.

Aloha i kekahi i kekahi. Love one another

We need your simple acts of Aloha. Today. Right now. Always.

Right on.

How can YOU share Aloha in the world today?

*Please leave a comment. I’d love to hear from you.

#ShareAloha

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jason poole, metta, lovingkindness meditation, halawa valley, pilipo solatorio, compassion, aloha, molokai, hawaiian language, kumu hawaii

The other day, someone asked me:

“What’s the Hawaiian word for compassion?”

August has been called Metta Month or Lovingkindness Month. (Metta is the word for lovingkindness or compassion in an ancient language called Pali.  Not to be confused with the Hawaiian word pali which means cliffs.)

And lately there’s been a lot of buzz on social media about compassion, mostly about offering traditional phrases associated with a metta meditation practice:

May I be safe.

May I be happy.

May I be heathy.

May I dwell in peace.

In the meditation practice, the phrases are directed inward, toward the self, first.  Then they are directed outward, toward another individual.  And then they’re directed toward all beings everywhere.

So when I was asked what the Hawaiian word for compassion is, I had to stop and think about it for a minute.  Why? Well, because I couldn’t remember Pops and I ever talking about compassion with each other, at least not in a formal sense.  And because I didn’t have my Hawaiian dictionary with me.

I’m not a native Hawaiian speaker. I started learning the language late-ish in life from Pops.  (A little backstory: When my “official studies” in Hālawa Valley began—even before I even understood they were beginning—he suddenly refused to speak English to me. He only spoke Hawaiian. I tried to explain to him that I didn’t understand what he was saying and he said that was ok. I could learn by observing. And the only way I’d learn how to speak Hawaiian would be if I HAD to use it to communicate.  More on that whole experience in an upcoming blog post.)

So I imagined being in Hālawa Valley and trying to communicate with Pops.  Not having a dictionary has forced me to be resourceful and creative with the language. (Note: Pops assures me that this is how people used to speak a long time ago, figuring out how to convey what they meant to say on the spot, even though vocabulary varied from island to island or even district to district. I trust him. Kind of.)

How would I convey the word compassion to him?

I thought about what the practice really meant, about what those phrases were really saying.  And it came down to this one word: A L O H A

Aloha is love. And yes, it can mean love in a romantic way. But really it’s love at its most basic essence.  Love between friends. Family love. Some might even say Divine Love.

I added the words I love you in front of the four classic metta phrases and it made perfect sense:

I love you. May you be safe.

I love you. May you be happy.

I love you. May you be healthy.

I love you. May you dwell in peace.

That got me thinking about the four traditional metta phrases.  Did anything exist like that in the Hawaiian culture?

The answer came to my mind immediately.  Not four individual phrases.  Only one:

Aloha i kekahi i kekahi.  Love one another.

Pops always says that’s the old Hawaiian way, the old Hawaiian greeting.  Aloha i kekahi i kekahi. Love to one another. Love to us all.

I explained this all to the poor soul who’d asked me. I’m sure I gave way more information than she was looking for. But it was good for me to think about.  And it was great to find a way to share that with another person.

Later, when I got home, I pulled out my favorite book, the Hawaiian Dictionary (Pukui & Elbert) and looked up the word compassion. I wanted to see what they wrote, to see how far off the mark I’d been.

And you know what the first Hawaiian word in the definition was?

Yup.

A L O H A.

Right on.

Aloha i kekahi i kekahi.  Love one another.

2 Comments
Jason Poole, Accidental Hawaiian Crooner, Molokai, Hawaii, Halawa Valley, Anakala Pilipo Solatorio, Pilipo Solatorio

Aloha i kekahi i kekahi.

I can hear Pops’ voice in my head: “Aloha i kekahi i kekahi.  Love one another.  So important.”

I need to remember that.  We all need to remember that.

Right on.

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Opening

Monday, February 16, 2015

an icy draft blew across my face

as i opened my eyes this morning

checking the temperature–

a frigid 3-degrees

i wanted to close my eyes

go back inside the warm world of sleepy dreams

 

turning on the computer

i was  slammed with news

of death and destruction

i wanted to close my eyes

and snuggle back into the security blanket of ignorance

 

today i want to close myself off

close my eyes

hide

but i hear pops’ voice in my head

“aloha i kekahi i kekahi”

love one another

and i open

 

we must share the aloha

we must share the warmth

 

 

 

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Happy Valentine’s Day

Saturday, February 14, 2015

jason poole, accidental hawaiian crooner, molokai, halawa valley, pilipo solatorio, anakala pilipo, aloha i kekahi i kekahi

Aloha i kekahi i kekahi.

Love one another.

May we all share Aloha today.

Happy Valentine’s Day, gang.

Right on.

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Aloha Paris

Friday, January 9, 2015

Jason Poole, Aloha, Aloha Paris, aloha i kekahi i kekahi, accidental hawaiian crooner, Molokai, Halawa Valley, Paris, eiffel tower

Aloha i kekahi i kekahi.

Love one another.

May we all share Aloha with each other today.

Right on.

1 Comment